Thirty-Seven Miles Of The Mokelumne Became California's 12th Wild And Scenic River

Thirty-Seven Miles Of The Mokelumne Became California's 12th Wild And Scenic River

Thirty-seven miles of the North Fork and main stem of the Mokelumne River running through Amador and Calaveras counties became California’s 12th California Wild and Scenic River, yesterday, when Governor Brown signed SB 854. Language included in the bill embodies recommendations made by the California Natural Resources Agency’s Mokelumne River Wild and Scenic River Study Report. The recommendations and legislation—which included five special provisions to protect local water supplies—were broadly supported by a coalition of interests including river conservation, fish and recreation organizations; businesses and tourism organizations; foothill and East Bay water agencies; local water agencies and Amador and Calaveras counties. “This legislation is a true win-win. It protects the Mokelumne River water supply that Amador County residents depend on for nearly all of our public water,” said Amador Water Agency Board President, Art Toy. “At the same time, it protects the river environment and recreation.” While Scott Ratterman of CCWD’s board called it a “landmark achievement that protects local water rights and the river for future generations.” The Mokelumne was found eligible for state Wild and Scenic designation because of its extraordinary scenic and recreational values. The river provides water for residents and agriculture in foothill counties, Central Valley Agriculture and communities, and residents of the East Bay. The Mokelumne is also home to an extensive PG&E hydroelectric project. Water and power uses and operations will not be affected by the designation, which bars new on-stream dams on the five designated river segments.

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