January Storms Help Push Snowpack Average

January Storms Help Push Snowpack Average

A series of January storms have helped push the Sierra Nevada snowpack to 100 percent of average to date. The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) conducted its second manual snowpack reading at its Phillips State near Lake Tahoe Thursday.  Those figures show 50 inches of snow depth and a snow water equivalent (SWE) of 18 inches, which is 98 percent of average for that location.  Statewide, the Sierra snowpack is 100 percent of average.  According to DWR spokesperson John King this is all very encouraging as we still have two more months to accumulation the typical maximum snow accumulation.  By comparison, at this station last February measurements were 2.6 inches of SWE and 30% percent of average.  While DWR officials acknowledge that this is a good start, they say the next two or three months will determine what it means for reservoirs and the overall water supply.  Although a three-year drought emergency ended in 2017, DWR officials still urge the public to continue water conservation efforts. 

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